order#


order#
order n
1 *association, society, club
2 *command, injunction, bidding, behest, mandate, dictate
Analogous words: instruction, direction, charging or charge (see corresponding verbs at COMMAND)
order vb
1 Order, arrange, marshal, organize, systematize, methodize are comparable when they mean to put (a number of persons or things) in proper place especially relatively or to bring about an orderly disposition of individuals, units, or elements that comprise (a thing).
Order is somewhat outmoded when the idea of putting in a definite order is to be expressed; it more usually implies a straightening out and may connote either the elimination of friction or confusion, often with resulting peace or harmony, or the imposition of a fixed and rigid discipline
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iordered his affairs in expectation of death

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it was a home strictly ordered, and he would have to conform to its orderingArchibald Marshall

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the Greek states . . . were not well ordered; on the contrary, they were always on the verge, or in the act, of civil warDickinson

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a period of yearly relaxation in London, ordered and increasingly stately— Sackville-West

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Arrange is more often used than order where the idea of setting in proper sequence, relationship, or adjustment is uppermost. The word often implies a notion of what is orderly, fit, suitable, or right and a placing of things in accordance with this notion
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they are the great organizers . . . the Germans classify, but the French arrangeGather

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arrange the furniture in a room

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arrange fruit in a dish

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each of us arranges the world according to his own notion of the fitness of things— Conrad

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Often the term implies a determination of the way in which the things are disposed by an end in view and then suggests careful management or manipulation
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we shall arrange matters so that you will not be inconvenienced

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arrange the details of a conference

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she arranged leave for a counselor whose mother was ill— Auchincloss

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political and economic life had been arranged in Utopian fashion— Henry Miller

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Marshal usually connotes generalship and implies assemblage and arrangement either for ease or advantage in management (as under stress) or for effectiveness in display or exhibition
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marshal troops for battle

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paused to marshal his thoughts before beginning his address

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marshaled like soldiers in gay company, the tulips stand arrayed— Lowell

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thanks to Mr. Dawson's erudition and his gift of marshaling facts, we begin to have a notion of what it is all about— Huxley

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Organize implies an arrangement in which all persons or things are so related to each other that they work as a unit, each individual having his or its proper function or duty
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organize the supporters of a candidate for the presidency

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part of this service is organizing—cataloging, classifying, and arranging on shelves—the collected literature— Bercaw

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the traditional logic was a logic for clarifying and organizing that which was already known— Dewey

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Systematize implies arrangement according to a definite and planned scheme; thus, one systematizes one's daily work when one reduces it to routine order
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if grammar was to become a rational science, it had to systematize itself through principles of logic— H. O. Taylor

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how Philosophy . . . blindly spinneth her geometric webs, testing and systematizing even her own disorders— Bridges

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Methodize differs from systematize in suggesting the imposition of orderly procedure rather than of a fixed scheme; thus, one can methodize one's work without giving it the character of routine
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that art of reasoning . . . which methodizes and facilitates our discourse— Shorthouse

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philosophical decisions are nothing but the reflections of common life, methodized and corrected— Thilly

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Analogous words: *adjust, regulate: *line, line up, align, range, array
2 *command, bid, enjoin, direct, instruct, charge
Analogous words: prohibit, *forbid, interdict, inhibit, ban
Contrasted words: permit, allow, *let: license, *authorize, commission

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • order — or·der 1 n 1: a state of peace, freedom from unruly behavior, and respect for law and proper authority maintain law and order 2: an established mode or state of procedure a call to order 3 a: a mandate from a superior authority see also …   Law dictionary

  • Order — Or der, n. [OE. ordre, F. ordre, fr. L. ordo, ordinis. Cf. {Ordain}, {Ordinal}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Regular arrangement; any methodical or established succession or harmonious relation; method; system; as: (a) Of material things, like the books in …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • Order No. 1 — Order Number 1 was issued March 1, 1917 (O.S.) and was the first official decree of The Petrograd Soviet of Workers and Soldiers Deputies. The order was issued following the February Revolution in response to actions taken the day before by the… …   Wikipedia

  • order — [ôr′dər] n. [OFr ordre < L ordo (gen. ordinis), straight row, regular series, akin to ordiri, to lay the warp, hence begin, set in order, prob. < IE base * ar , to join, fit > ARM1, ART1] 1. social position; rank in the community 2. a… …   English World dictionary

  • order — ► NOUN 1) the arrangement of people or things according to a particular sequence or method. 2) a state in which everything is in its correct place. 3) a state in which the laws and rules regulating public behaviour are observed. 4) an… …   English terms dictionary

  • order — [n1] arrangement, organization adjustment, aligning, array, assortment, cast, categorization, classification, codification, composition, computation, disposal, disposition, distribution, establishment, form, grouping, harmony, layout, line,… …   New thesaurus

  • Order — Or der, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Ordered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Ordering}.] [From {Order}, n.] 1. To put in order; to reduce to a methodical arrangement; to arrange in a series, or with reference to an end. Hence, to regulate; to dispose; to direct; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Order 81 — is one of the most controversial of Paul Bremer s 100 Orders, issued during the reconstruction of Iraq following the invasion of Iraq by the United States in 2003. The order establishes intellectual property restrictions on the use of genetically …   Wikipedia

  • Order — Sf Anweisung, Befehl per. Wortschatz fremd. Erkennbar fremd (17. Jh.) Entlehnung. Entlehnt aus frz. ordre, das von l. ordo Ordnung, Regel stammt. Verb: ordern, beordern.    Ebenso nndl. order, ne. order, nschw. order, nnorw. ordre; Orden.… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache


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